Easter basket

This is the first year I’ve put together an Easter basket for the Peanut. Last year he was only 4 months old so there really wasn’t much point in an Easter basket last year. Though he did wear the most adorable little onesie with bunnies and chicks on it that read: “Team Jellybean.” Anyway, this year I crocheted the Peanut a little bunny using this pattern. I also picked up a board book about baby mountain goats. The photos in the book were taken by a local photographer. I also found a little wind-up bird that hops at the grocery store. I have no doubt it will break pretty quick, but it was cheap and it’ll be entertaining for Peanut. Finally, I bought some plastic eggs that have a neat metallic sheen to them. I only used half in the Easter basket and filled a couple of them with Cheerios so the eggs rattle and Jonathan can munch on the contents.

Easter basketI am rather pleased with Peanut’s first Easter basket. In years to come I’m sure we’ll add a chocolate bunny (is there anything more fun on Easter than chomping the ears right off a chocolate rabbit?) and an age-appropriate toy or book. This is probably the only year I can have the basket sitting out in the open and Jonathan just ignores it. Next year will be a different story, I’m sure! But that’s what the top shelf of the closet is for!

Here’s a couple more photos of the charming little crochet bunny, which was so easy and quick to make up:

Crochet bunny

Crochet bunny closeupAren’t the button eyes adorable? It reminds me of reading the book “The Velveteen Rabbit” when I was younger. Speaking of which, that book would be a great Easter present for older children.

We’re spending Easter at a new friend’s house. Jonathan and my new friend’s 22-month-old daughter will be Easter egg “hunting”! And by hunting I mean picking up the eggs strewn about in plain sight. While Mom and Dad put back mimosas and deviled eggs. Maybe there are better things than chocolate bunny ears after all…

Happy Easter, everyone!

 

 

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Ripples

Started working on another baby/lap blanket. It’s already pretty much gorgeous. I’m using Debbie Bliss cashmerino aran yarn in eight different colors.

Ripples in progressIsn’t it just lovely so far? I’m using an H (5 mm) hook and Lucy from Attic 24’s ripple pattern. Is there anyone in crochetland who doesn’t just adore Attic 24? I just ogle at her photos and beautiful crochet projects. Crochet porn!

Anyway, I’m hoping to sell this blanket. Haven’t decided yet whether or not to start an Etsy page, or to just try to sell in some local stores or at local craft fairs. I’ve been chatting with a friend of mine who’s a wicked good knitter about going in together for craft fairs so we can split the cost of the booth. We think we’d be pretty successful because we’ve both got a good eye for color. But I worry about getting what I want for my work. I bought the eight skeins of yarn on sale for $7 (normally they’re $10.50). So just my cost of materials alone is $56. And I like to at least pay myself a little for my time and effort (well, actually, I’d like to pay myself so I can afford to go buy more yarn for my next project). I think I’ll ask $125-$150 for this blanket when it’s done (which is paying myself about $3 an hour, by the way), but the question remains, can I get it? I suppose if it doesn’t sell I have a lovely lap blanket for myself. I’m also trying to make a bunch of baby hats/women’s hats to sell, and perhaps some garlands and mobiles.

More ripplesIn other news, I picked up a little bag to hold my hooks, scissors, stitch markers, and tapestry needles last time I was at the yarn store. I’ve been on the hunt for something for a while to corral my hooks. I’d pinned a number of crochet hook book patterns, but I think I like this little drawstring bag better. It was made locally and I love the fabric the lady used for my home state.

MT hook bagAnd now I’ll leave you with a little glimpse of heaven:

Basket of yarn

Crochet key keeper

Found a nifty little tutorial about how to make crochet baskets. So I made one, with a few tweaks. Mine’s shorter than the tutorial, but I didn’t need a tall basket to begin. I wanted to make a basket to set on the shelf we have by the front door. It’s so people can put their keys and phones in the little basket while they’re visiting so they don’t get lost. OK, so most people actually just put their keys and phone in their pockets or purse but you know what? I made the basket anyway. And it’s pretty awesome.

Crochet basket 1

I find it deeply amusing that despite my photography skillz I can’t get the color of the yarn to come out on camera as it truly looks in real life. The red yarn in this picture looks really red. Like fire engine red. It’s not! More of a muted deeper red. Ah, well. So it goes. The yarn I used is made in the good ol’ U.S. of A. (and do you know how hard it can be to find U.S.-made yarn?) in Mitchell, Nebraska, which is 9 miles from where my grandparents live. The yarn is Brown Sheep Co., Inc.’s Lambs Pride Superwash Bulky. The colors I used are Red Wing and Grey Heather. It’s a very nice, thick yarn. Not super soft, but not scratchy either. Made a nice tight weave for the basket! (So tight that with this particular yarn my hands were beginning to ache when I wrapped this project up!)

WEB crochet basket 2

And here’s my keys demonstrating the purpose of the basket. I realize now that this also looks like a Maranda Lee advertisement, which it isn’t, but hey, if you’re looking for nifty Montana-made purses, diaper bags, and accessories, you could check out Maranda Lee’s stuff too. She’s got some pretty cute things!

If you’re looking for more crochet patterns and projects, might I suggest you browse over my crochet Pinterest board? Good ideas there, I promise!