Bentwood cane chair

When I was at my favorite antique/consignment store last weekend picking up chairs for the brewery, there was a deliciously retro rocking chair for sale that was definitely in my price range at $15. It had lovely curvy lines. Cane back and seat. And even though the cane seat is ripped and needs replacing, I knew the chair was something awesome. But I left without it. And kicked myself for that all week, especially after I saw  the same one in this design post. I couldn’t get the picture to embed, but if you want to take a look, it’s the 21st picture in the post (I counted two vertical pictures side-by-side as one photo for my counting purposes).

I thought surely at that price the lovely rocker would be gone in no time flat. So imagine my great joy when I went back this weekend and there was my rocker! I snatched it up at once.

Cane chair 2

Isn’t it awesome? I think it’s pretty spectacular. And for $15? Steal. Most of the chairs like it I found with a quick Google search turned up chairs selling for $70-$150.

WEB 2-2-13 cane chair 3

As you can see the cane seat is in rough shape. I haven’t decided yet if I am going to try to reinforce it from underneath or if I’ll remove the cane seat and build a cushion instead.

WEB 2-2-13 cane chair 4

Initially I thought I would paint it a bright color like red. I think it would make a great accent piece for our living room. But my husband said he thinks it should remain stained wood. If we keep it stained wood I will sand the current stain down and re-stain it to get rid of the dings and scratches that are most visible. I think we’ll wait to do anything with it for a month or two to give it time to percolate in our brains so we make the right decision.

WEB 2-2-13 cane chair 5

And if we can’t save the cane seat, well, the rest of the chair has great bones. I am sure it will look beautiful no matter what we do with it!

P.S. Yep, you got it, my bookshelves are not styled. We have so many books (and I like it that way), there’s no room for styling!

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Project DIY: Dresser

This week, after trolling Craigslist for a while, I found a $50 antique dresser for sale. I snapped up the dresser and THE SAME DAY sold my old armoire for $75, which was a nice piece of furniture but was also a hand-me-down and just wasn’t my style. So here’s some photos of the dresser. Consider these the “before” shots. I’m planning to sand the dresser, re-stain it a different color, and also line the drawers with some nice paper (using Mod Podge like the last post). My goal is to make it something I will like for a while, but also something I can pass on to my kiddo once my husband and I can actually shell out the clams to buy a matching bedroom set (oh, some day!). So it has to be something I like, but also something not too feminine. The only thing I dislike about the dresser is the diamond accents on the sides. Unfortunately them suckers are GLUED on like that sort of thing is never going out of style. So I need to figure out how to pop them off without ruining the veneer. Any suggestions anybody?

But enough yakking. Here’s the “before” dresser. Stayed tuned for the “after”!

My favorite part of the dresser so far is being able to put by jewelry box and some nice decorative things on top. Couldn’t do that very easily with my armoire because it was so tall.

A little bit DIY

This is the set of drawers formerly known as the Lincoln Log drawers. I found them hideous. After taking quite a beating in a house full of college boys, I declared to Shawn that we were going to give the drawers a makeover. And boy are we glad we did. We removed the Lincoln Log handles, painted the drawers, stained the top and added new pulls.

Plus the project was an excuse to break out the belt sander. OK, borrow and break out the belt sander. As the saying goes, you don’t need a boat, you need friends with boats. You don’t need a belt sander, just friends with belt sanders. So Shawn sanded the larger surfaces with the belt sander and I followed with 150 grit sandpaper. After sanding, I applied wood conditioner to the top and then stained with MinWax English Chestnut. I primed the drawers and then painted them with a semi-gloss white paint (three coats). The project took about five hours, not including drying time.

Gorgeous! We’re proud that we re-made a set of sturdy drawers rather than going out and trying to buy something. We spent less than $25 on this transformation.